Opinion

On Jan. 1, 2018, I, Hillary Lutter, will have been Editor and Chief of the Sanborn Weekly Journal for 14 years. That will be my last day.
It’s been a unique, fun and very fulfilling experience, and I have enjoyed the loyalty and support of our great communities. It truly has been an interesting ride, and there’s been some awesome experiences along the way.
I believe it can take a trained eye to realize when something is finished; people tend to float through life doing what is familiar, shoving their true hopes aside in favor of the status quo. “Someday I’ll do X or Y,” when in reality someday often never comes.
Or maybe it’s just a mid-life crisis. Unbelievably to me, I’m not necessarily too young for one of those. Throughout the past year or so, I’ve come to realize I’m not too young for much of anything.
“Making memories.” This is a favorite saying these days, it seems. Everyone is “making memories” all over social media – and annoying the heck out of me. Why not say, “We are living. Look what we did in our lives today!” To me, the phrase “making memories” implies these events will never again take place, but they were fun while they lasted; sure glad we have a memory, because that’s all we’ll ever have.
Or maybe I’m just overthinking things in a negative voice. But seriously, why not just LIVE, because you’re able? No one knows how much time they have left. The important thing is to live each day with one simple goal: Be Happy Today.
I might be getting too philosophical just to say one thing, that it’s time for me to be finished with this newspaper. It’s taken a lot of searching to get here, and I do not take it lightly, as I know this may mean the end of a service business as old as the town of Woonsocket itself. But, here I am, and I have no regrets, and I have no guilt. At some point, one has to DO for themselves in a completely selfish way.
My husband and I have been running Badlands Agronomy for four years now, from two opposite ends of the state. Splitting my time has become unfair to Bryan, myself and our business, and it is well past time for me to put all my efforts into us.
A quote often attributed to Buddha (but not proven to really be from him) are words that run through my mind nearly every day lately: “The trouble is, you think you have time.”
I’ve come to realize my happiness, my health and my plans for the future are at stake, and these are things I can no longer ignore.
So, here it is: I have lost the ability to do this newspaper the justice it deserves. It’s time to pass the torch, or call it a day. The decision wasn’t easy, but it has come to a point where staying with it is no longer an option. That space between the rock and the hard place is not a good place to be, so I’m going to find a foothold and climb out of there… and what will be, will be.
I leave you with this, and I really hope you take a second and think about it:
Live life for the moment, not for the memories. Tomorrow is never guaranteed, so don’t wait too long to be HAPPY.
-30-

When you think about giving back to the soldiers who serve our country, what do you think of?  Many think about donating items for care packages. One soldier told me before he was deployed to support him and the others by being there for their families who are left behind. I recently experienced this type of amazing support by being blessed with this random act of kindness.
In November 2016, my significant other, Mike, and more than 160 soldiers from the South Dakota Army National Guard 153rd Engineer Battalion and its Forward Support Company, deployed to Kuwait for a nine-month deployment. At this time, the family members and loved ones took over to keep things going in the absence of their loved ones. Military families prepare for deployment, like going over emergency contacts, discussing household finances and routines. Even when you think you are fully prepared, the unexpected can still happen.
In December of this last year, a winter storm destroyed our garage roof. Shingles had blown off the roof and were scattered all over the yard.  Panic set in, and it was time to think things through and get the job done. I called the insurance company and reached out to people on our emergency contact list. We were able to at least get some patchwork done to hold us over until the spring.
When spring came, I called around to get various quotes on the roof to get it repaired.  With the limited time, I strived to find ways to make the calls. I was losing hope that it would not get fixed before Mike would come home.
A couple of weeks ago, my prayers were answered. A neighbor stopped by and saw the damaged roof.  He said, “Let me see what I can do to take care of this for your soldier.” Next thing I knew, he had arranged for Mitchell Roofing & Siding to repair the roof for no charge! What a great act of kindness of neighbors helping neighbors and an act of kindness and generosity from Cory at Mitchell Roofing & Siding that helped repair the roof. I was overwhelmed and taken aback by the kindness, and a huge burden has been lifted off of my soldier!
What Cory from Mitchell Roofing & Siding did for our family is a true spirit and support for our soldier and the community in which they serve. Thank you!
Coleen Smith

To the Editor,
My cousin, Raeburn Grassel Moore, sent me a copy of the Sanborn Weekly Journal  of March 30 with the article and pictures of the quilts made in Sanborn County in 1913.  Raeburn pointed out that both our grandmothers and mother and aunts had signatures on the blocks in the quilts.
I took the paper to our families’ Easter dinner and showed the article to the families of four of our children who live in Minnesota. They were interested in the amazing article and the pictures of the quilts.  One of our sons took an enlarged picture of our relatives’ signatures and emailed them to our other four children and their families in Vermont, Montana, North Carolina and D.C.
I lived in Woonsocket with my parents, Matt and Lorinda Roache, until I was 12 years old and attended St. Joseph’s School.
Kathleen Krumholz